Gr8 Products

NuStock Ointment:



Strainer option for Fermented Feed:
   

Apple Cider Vinegar with Mother:

Egg Skelter - comes in red, cream and silver:   
Egg Skelter - Cream


Neem Oil may be sprayed on roosts to help control mite & lice infestations:
                 
               
Shaklee Soap
        
Poultry Cup Drinker:
300 Poultry Cup Drinker


Vet Wrap Self-Adhesive Bandage:
Vet Wrap

Ceramic Heat element - Brood chicks  without light:

                                                


Brooder clamp light - can be used with ceramic heat element:



11 comments:

  1. I have been looking for something pretty to store my eggs on the counter...I have never seen an "Egg Skelter" but that is so cool.

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  2. I like it a lot too. Not sure how large it is, though. I entered a contest to try to win one! Good luck to me :)

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  3. It *looks* like the egg skelter holds about 24 eggs - pretty good as the last one I saw was only available in the UK and held 12 eggs.

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  4. Hello! Was the Neem Oil used on the roosts for lice and mite prevention/remediation?

    LM

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    Replies
    1. Yes - the Neem Oil works great on roosts to prevent mite and lice infestations from coming back.

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  5. I'm still waiting on the eggs, then I'll look into the egg skelter!! I think my pulletts are getting close to POL, but no eggs yet!!

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  6. How long should eggs be left to set on the counter?

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    Replies
    1. As long as you don't wash the egg (washing removes the "bloom" which protects the eggs) they are generally good for at least 2 weeks. Many people say eggs last even longer than that when left out, but for safety reasons I'm not going to be the one to recommend that to you. If you are concerned about whether or not your eggs are still good, put it in a cup of water. If it sinks, it's fine. If it floats to the top, toss it. (Standing on end is usually fine to eat also... just don't leave those about much longer.)

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  7. I'll recommend it...I leave mine out for as long it takes to sell them or eat them. Never had any spoil or taste off all these many years. Y'all need to lighten up and stop living in fear of food safety with your home grown foods.

    What amazes me is that folks nowadays feel very comfortable eating eggs and meats from sources that have proven to have confirmed kills, have been recalled for Salmonella, e.coli, etc. contamination and all those foods were handled and stored according to the USDAs recommended rules for "food safety". What an oxymoron when coming from the USDA. I can just imagine them all sitting in committee, laughing and heehawing about what they can get the public to believe THIS week...probably even have a contest to come up with the most ridiculous lie that folks will swallow.

    But everyone keeps eating them as they dine in restaurants and in their homes with this false sense of security...as if the USDA holds some magic wand they wave over their horribly unsafe food that makes it alright~after all, THEY know enough to store their foods in refrigerators and us simple-minded country folks aren't smart enough to see the "dangers" of storing foods outside the fridge or canning without using pressure canners.

    WAKE UP, PEOPLE! Shake off your TV induced stupor and realize that you are gagging on a gnat and swallowing a mule on this issue of food safety regarding eggs, and food canned at home.

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  8. I'll second what Bee said... I don't refrigirate eggs since i also sell them for hatching. so they sit on the chest freezer until used or incubated. tho anything beyond 10 days for incubation is questionable, so we usually eat those.

    as for washing them, I use an egg wash prior to cooking (bought at TSC) so that I don't accidentallly get any dirty shell into whatever i'm making.

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  9. I agree with Bee eggs are OK on the counter or Wherever is convenient for you to store them in my case on the floor in the laundry room!!!

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